Writing is Personal? Since when? (Writing Tip No. 7)

“Curiouser and curiouser.”

Writing is Personal? Since when? (Writing Tip No. 7)

The Writing Part

Any writer throughout history will tell you this (yes, I’ve met and asked them all): writing is you and your soul on paper. Once you release your words, they are for public fare. Can you live with what you’ve written with no “take backsies” or rewrites? If you answered yes, then maybe your manuscript is ready to get out there. Maybe that is the key to knowing when you are finished with anything. When you can see your words there, as they stand; they represent you in many meaningful ways. No matter if you’re writing an autobiography or a brilliant fantasy of a world where ordinary people never have to choose between being Team Edward or Team Jacob—if you are writing that book, please let me be your story’s first eyes!—the quest is always the same. Love your words and your words will love you back. It’s a symbiotic relationship we often take for granted. But then again… they are only words.

But you own them! Make them go! Get your crazy eyes on and write how you feel and how it matters. Then throw out that scorned teen’s diary nonsense and start over. Extreme? I’m just guessing. Cuz that’s where I go at some beginnings. But your own bad or cliche* writing can give you perspective and help you move forward with your craft. Take a step back and ask, “What’s wrong with this picture?” Overall and in pieces. If it’s yours and perfect and you approve, set it free.

Or just keep a stack of thought and story-filled notebooks under your mattress and enjoy them all for you only. May whatever goal you seek for your work come true. And while we’re askin’ for stuff… may God bless ponies and bunny rabbits.

The Reading Part

I am reading Watership Down as an audible.com book. And please don’t tell me that listening to a book can not be claimed as reading a book. I won’t have that argument because it is silly. I’m still getting the story. At any rate, please, no spoilers either. I have never read it and so far as I can see early on, it is quite magnificent. If you are familiar, I am so rooting for Fiver. I mean, why wouldn’t you be? Wait, don’t answer that. We’ll talk again in a few weeks. But the main plot of the story is that a group of bunnies leave the comfort of their home in the meadow because of an unfounded prediction that the entire herd <?what’s a giant group of bunnies that live together called? a common probably.> common would perish. That’s abouts alls I knows and I don’ts know no mores. I said there’d be unecessary plurals at some point earlier today.

But I do need to pick up my kindle again. I tried a few books recently but they all sort of petered my interest quickly out. In fact, the last good novel I read was (semi-ironically) The Reader. It’s a brutally honest look into the heart and mind of a former female Nazi guard and her torrent love affair with a 15 year old. Unbelievable that I had never heard of this book before but it was an excellent read to say least and it would be a wonder if it is not banned. Though I do believe there is a large gap between banning a book and quietly accepting one. I have a feeling that the educational community does the latter and doesn’t really draw attention to the book by teaching it. Though if a student found it on his own, he’d probably be encouraged by the school system. I would hope, anyway. Clearly these are only speculations on a much broader subject. It’s also one I didn’t mean to stumble into. So, with that…

The Part That Talks More About The Picture

Very cool, right? Check more testimonials at “Why I Write.”

The Part Where It Ends For Now

Today, a friend of mine sent me a literary quote and it speaks for itself:

In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life. It goes on. — Robert Frost

Why blog?

Why blog? It’s late and I’m tired from driving all day and I’m full from a less than delectable dinner at a sub-par chain steakhouse. So why blog?

Why blog when you owe yourself and your new novel 6,000 words (tomorrow it will be 8) according to your own set deadlines. Why blog when your laptop’s battery is nearing the dreaded red zone and its plug is so far away you could never reach it without moving. Why blog when you don’t know where your blog is going and you don’t know who is reading it or why. Why blog when you have nothing new to say or, what’s worse, no new way to say it? Here’s why: because anything that gets your fingers moving is a start. Any way to nudge open the doors of your creativity is a good one. Any blog, regardless if it seems promising only to fall short mid-sentence will… be… um… good?

Here’s how your blog should read:

Once upon a time a moo cow lulled soundly. The boy in the back of the classroom overheard it from the open window and sighed because he’d read that story once before in a book by a man who had a lot to say and an unprecedented way in painting his particular word pictures. The boy was very well-read for his age and he dreamed of one day traveling to all the far away places he’d always daydreamed. Was he daydreaming right now? Was he on his own trip? Was his flight overbooked? Not even he knew. But he was going to find out. As soon as he could remove his glumpy fist from under his chin. Just as quick as he could stop cloud gazing out the open window. The very moment the cow in the field stopped mooing! The boy would escape and flee and fly and run and swim and laugh and be gay throughout history and future forever to come until some unknown species of farm animal comes home.

If you have any energy left in you, you will realize that the shite before you is good for this: it is practice, it is good tempo, and it very well could be a start. Of course, it could also be pure rubbish. But if that is the case then at least it is pure.

Write a word.

Write another.

Write now. Think later. Re-write. Go.

<You are now running on battery reserve power. Edit tomorrow? nah.>